Panel complete and other stuff

Total: 2367.1
wiring: 117
Panel: 2.5
Total wiring & panel: 263.5
Plumbing: 4.5
Total plumbing: 39.5
Firewall forward: 3.0
Total firewall forward: 6.1
Misc: 4.0
Total Misc: 9.7

So many wires. Little wires. Big wires. long wires. short wires. pins and sockets. So many pins and sockets. … The panel wiring is complete. The two main Dynon screens, the GTN650, and the audio panel (PMA-450A) are not yet installed because I don’t yet own them. But I did purchase the connector kits for those screens and have those installed with the trays. So when I do eventually buy these avionics I’ll just slide them in and be done. This was the part of the build I had been looking forward to from the start. It’s the only part so far where there was no learning curve to scale. The reason being that by profession I’m an EE and have plenty of experience with wires and circuits and pins and sockets. This was the easiest part of the build for me. … Now we’ll be back to the tough stuff – like the engine and installing windows and plenty more fiber-glass and body work.

Because of a misunderstanding on how the GD-40 (CO detector) interfaces with the other equipment I decided to drill a couple more holes in the panel and install the button and LED for this sensor. I had thought it just talked directly to the Dynon equipment but it doesn’t. So I added the button and light and the associated labels.

There was this annoying gap in the front fresh-air vents where they came in contact (or rather didn’t come in contact) with the sides of the airplane. I fixed this. The fresh-air vents look pretty good now, if I do say so myself.

All the pitot and static and AOA lines run fore-aft. This is done. The three lines run from their respective points in the tail and wings to the ADAHRS units in the back as well as the D6 in the front. There’s also a static air switch to open the static line to the cabin right on the panel.

I decided to install the remote magnetic compass for the backup instrument (Dynon D6). This is done and sits right under the ADAHRS units in the back.

Firewall forward: got the pass-throughs and a bunch of other stuff in place (almost ready to hang the engine).

Just lots of little things too numerous to mention.

 

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Wiring wiring more wiring and plumbing

Total: 2144.3 hours
Wiring since last time: 53.5 hours
Plumbing since last time: 35.0 hours
Total wiring so far: 114.0 hours
Total plumbing: 35.0 hours

Wiring is everything having to do with the panel and getting electricity from the panel to where it needs to be. Plumbing is everything having to do with pitot/static lines and fresh air vents.

Much done. See the pictures (including building a deck for the in-laws which is not airplane related but it helps the kids build up some important skills which we all use for the airplane build).

Of note: Engine and propeller are here.

Issues. Serious issue with the front fresh air vents. The panel which is not stock seriously interferes with the position of the front NACA vents. And it’s impossible to use any standard fitting over both the vent and the NACA inlet. At least 20 of the “plumbing” hours were spent devising a way to get the air to the eye-ball vents and mounting those vents. I am still in the process of making it all pretty but am so far very pleased with the solution which is going to look great. In short, I made some boxes in which to mount the vents. And then had to fabricate a duct from fiberglass to direct the air from the NACA inlets to the vents. In the end because of the very tight space and my self-imposed requirement that the duct and hose must be able to come off and on without removing the panel, in the end I glassed the hose directly into the duct. This was a largely trial and error process so these ducts are quite ugly (ugly indeed). But they’ll do the job (and never be seen) and if I ever have to remake them (or I ever just decide to remake them to avoid that annoying feeling that a monkey could have done better) I’ll be able to make them look nice since I’ll know the final dimensions ahead of time. This was a bear of a job and it’s just time to move on.